Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak & New Haven Green Exhibit

Nothing_IsSetIn_Stone_Show_Flyer

Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green 

Opening at the New Haven Museum on April 30th @ 5:00-8:00 PM [Map Here]

The exhibit will be on view during April 30 – November 02, 2014  [Facebook Post]

Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green is a pairing of contemporary art and archaeological analysis featuring new works by:

Lani Asuncion
Susan Clinard
Erich Davis
Michael Quirk
Jeff Slomba
Rachael Vaters-Carr
Alison K. Walsh

In October 2012, winds from Hurricane Sandy toppled the Lincoln Oak, revealing a partial human skeleton among the tree’s exposed roots, along with two buried time capsules, creating an enigmatic story that captured the imagination of the entire country.

For the artistic portion of this exhibit, the artists used branches, limbs, or pieces of the trunk of the Lincoln Oak to interpret the history of the tree and the discoveries found beneath it.

The exhibit also features the results of the on-going archaeological analysis of the bones and materials found beneath the tree. This includes displays of the time capsule contents, and the inquiries into the possible identities of the skeletal remains.

For more information please contact info(at)newhavenmuseum.org or Jason Bischoff-Wurstle at 203-562-4183 x 18

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I will be showing a new work created for this exhibit entitled Shrine of the Common & Undivided Lands which is a multi-media piece that incorporates a one-channel video Reverence and sculptural elements.

Shrine of the Common & Undivided Lands is a memorial tribute to the bones found coiled within the uprooted Lincoln Tree, and all the hundreds of other bodies buried under the Green. In the video Reverence, performers Kate Gonzales and Julie Riccio animate the branches of the tree with a ritual like dance. The cement sculptural base refers to the time capsules found under the tree with a portion of one that was casted into the bone remains of a child and his/her marble, and the ash is derived from the branches of the tree. The large bowl within the cement base is for collecting pennies left by visitors, to show respect and remembrance.
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